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Microchipping your Pet

When a pet becomes separated from their owner, either they have been stolen or they have been lost, it is sometimes hard to be reunited again with their family. Most dogs wear collars with ID tags on them, but sometimes collars are taken off or lost which makes it hard to identify who the pet belongs to. If someone were to find them, they are typically going to take them to either a shelter or a veterinary clinic. When the animal is brought into either one of these places the first thing that will most likely be done is they will be scanned for a microchip.

A microchip is a small electronic chip, about the size of a grain of rice, that is used as a form of identification. Microchips are found under the skin, typically in the scruff. When a scanner is passed over an activated microchip, the chip transmits an identification number to the scanner. That ID number is then used to look up the information that is linked to the microchip, and that information will help direct them to the correct owners.

Microchips used in pets only contain identification numbers, they are not a GPS device and they cannot track your animal. The information that you give when you register your pet will be used to contact you if your pet were to be found. The information that is commonly given to the company would be your name, address, and phone number.

Microchips are injected subcutaneously (under the skin) same as any other subcutaneous injection, with the only difference being the size of the needle. Surgery or anesthesia for dog and cats surgery is not required, however many will wait until their animal is under anesthetic for their neuter/spay before micro chipping. Once the microchip is implanted in your pet it is registered with the owners contact information. The owners are responsible for updating any information that may change but other than that there is not anything else that needs to be done with the microchip.

If you are wanting to microchip your pet, contact your veterinary clinic and they can get the process underway.

 

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