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cat-services

Cat Neutering and Spaying

Spaying and neutering your pet is an important step towards preventing undesirable behaviours, disease prevention, and pet overpopulation. Each year thousands of cats are euthanized at shelters across Canada due to an insufficient number of homes.

What is spaying or neutering?

Spaying and neutering refers to the surgical removal of the testicles for males (neutering/castration) and the ovaries and uterus for females (spaying/ovariohysterectomy) under a general anesthetic. Your cat receives the best care during their surgical visit at our hospital which will include effective, state of the art pain management and lots of snuggles. We will be more than happy to discuss this important procedure with you and give you a tour of our surgical suite with top of the line equipment and recovery areas to assure you that your kitty will receive the best medical care.

When should I neuter/spay my cat?

Your veterinarian will discuss with you the best time for your cat to be spayed or neutered. Our veterinarians suggest doing it by 6 months of age.

What is the procedure to spay/neuter a cat?

Prior to surgery day, your cat will need to be up to date on their core vaccination (FVRCP). The day of your kitty’s surgery, you will be scheduled to arrive in the morning and will return for the discharge appointment late afternoon or evening the same day as the surgery. If you would like to bring a blanket or toy from home to smell of home, feel free to do so. We have blankets here for them but if they have a special one, we will be more than happy to include that in their kennel. After being admitted into the hospital, we obtain a weight and record vital signs and do a preliminary examination. Kitty will be set up in a hospital kennel with bedding and a litter box. No food or water is given until they are in recovery. Pre-anesthetic blood work being done will be completed before the surgery begins. Fluids are administered for the surgery as well. Premedication is given with pre-operative pain control. The surgery takes place under general anesthesia in our surgical suite. A veterinary Technician monitors anesthesia while the veterinarian performs the surgery. Temperature, pulse, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation and blood pressure are monitored. After the surgery is completed, kitty will be moved to recovery and is monitored for the rest of the day. Once kitty is moving around and alert, food and water are given. Home care instructions are written and home pain medication is prepared and once adequate snuggles have occurred through the day, kitty is ready to go home!

I was thoroughly impressed with the entire staff of this vet in relation to my experience this week. My cat…

Melanie Trickett

I cannot say enough good things about this place! The staff are terrific - they are knowledgeable and compassionate. The…

Loreatha Boehner

I cannot rave enough about Clayton Park Vet. I had been to MANY vets before finally finding these guys. Dr.…

Nicole Martelle

What a great first experience we had. My cat monkey was seen by dr. Farrow and he was thorough, he…

Tammy Mclennan

The staff at Clayton Park Vet Hospital are always friendly and knowledgeable. Dr. Farrow is great with my dog and…

Nicole Slaunwhite

Blog

Why I Became a Veterinary Assistant

Now, at the age of 27 years old, I am just starting my dream of helping animals of all walks of life. When I was 7 years old, my dog Brandy--a Golden Cocker Spaniel--passed away while I was spending the weekend with my mom.  Brandy lived at my dad’s. I did not know until the weekend after what had happened. I was not there... to help, to show love towards my dog who played with me and watched me grow.

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