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Puppy Vaccinations

That cute little bundle of fluff you have is more fragile than their play would have you believe! A puppy’s first immunity is passed to them by their mom when nursing. This immunity begins to wane and their systems need help from us to protect them from harmful diseases they are at risk of being exposed to. Vaccinating too early may not be effective as the natural immunity from their mom may interfere with the vaccines being given. For this reason, we recommend beginning the puppy vaccination series at eight weeks of age, with each of the three appointments being separated by 3-4 weeks (8, 12, and 16 weeks).

What vaccinations do you offer to new puppies?


All puppies are vaccinated against Distemper, Adenovirus, Parvovirus, and Parainfluenza (DA2PP, commonly called the “Distemper” vaccine). Rabies vaccination is given at the last visit in the puppy booster series. Additionally, Bordetella, Leptospirosis, and Lyme vaccines are available. Deciding which vaccines your puppy needs is best done in consultation with your Veterinarian.

Why is it important to properly vaccinate your puppy?


Complete and proper protection against communicable disease sets a solid foundation for your puppy to grow and thrive. Keeping your pup up-to-date on necessary vaccines also helps prevent the spread of disease to other dogs, and potentially people in your community.

What is an appropriate schedule for puppy vaccinations?


To avoid potential vaccine interference from maternal antibodies (those passed from the mom to the pup during nursing) we recommend beginning your puppy’s vaccination schedule at 8 weeks of age and ensuring boosters are administered in two more intervals of 3-4 weeks. A complete puppy vaccination schedule involves visits at approximately 8, 12, and 16 weeks of age.

How should you prepare your puppy for its first vaccination visit?


The veterinary clinic is a new environment for your pup, and as such, we want a calm, gentle and enjoyable introduction. It is best to arrive a few minutes ahead of your appointment so that your pup can investigate a bit. Be sure to bring any medical history including previous vaccinations, parasite protection and the name of the food you are feeding them. For their protection, all dogs need to be on a leash and depending on the size, your pup may feel best in the safety of their kennel if you have been using one at home/for transport. Bring your pup with a bit of an appetite and a small amount of their food from home. We love to give treats but also know how sensitive their tummies can be and don’t want to overload them with new foods. Being able to feed them their regular diet allows us the opportunity to reward them for their excellent behaviour and help them enjoy their visits without upsetting their growing bodies!

How much do puppy vaccinations cost?


We are pleased to offer a fantastic “Puppy Bundle” that includes the physical examination, vaccines, and parasite protection. Give the clinic a call today to inquire about pricing and which vaccines and parasite protections are covered.

This was my first time at this vet, they fit my bunny in for an emergency appointment as she was…

Claire Macdonald

I have been using Dartmouth Cities Veterinary Hospital for about 35 years and have always had wonderful service with every…

Beverley Gallant

I took my two cats there for a vaccine and a checkup. The staff is absolutely wonderful and did everything…

Katie Singer

The staff at Harbour Cities Vet hospital are always very welcoming and friendly. Their services are fairly priced and they…

Gabrielle Robichaud

I have been here twice now with my newly adopted Greyhound. Great place & very friendly staff. Highly recommend!

Lisa Campagna

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