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Dog x-Ray

Harbour Cities Veterinary Hospital is equipped with on-site x-ray capabilities. X-rays performed in-house are reviewed during your appointment so that recommendations for your pets’ care can be made promptly. Occasionally radiographs are sent out for a second opinion to a board certified radiologist.

How do you use x-ray and radiology services at your clinic?


We use radiology to help us diagnose or confirm suspected disease processes including but not limited to intestinal blockages (those socks your pet likes to eat), tumours or broken bones and changes in the heart, lungs, and other organs.

How do you prepare your dog for their x-ray appointment?


Most often x-rays appointments do not need any special preparation. From time to time x-rays will be done under sedation to ensure the pet does not move so that we can get diagnostic/quality images. When sedation is needed a member of our team will speak with you about fasting your pet and any other pre-diagnostic preparation that may be required.

How much do dog x-ray examinations cost?


The fees for x-rays vary depending on the number of radiographs taken and if sedation is required. Depending on the concern, the veterinarian may request more than the standard two views, or in the case of a barium study, a series of x-rays is taken over the course of a few hours. We are happy to provide you with an estimate of fees at the time of your appointment.

This was my first time at this vet, they fit my bunny in for an emergency appointment as she was…

Claire Macdonald

I have been using Dartmouth Cities Veterinary Hospital for about 35 years and have always had wonderful service with every…

Beverley Gallant

I took my two cats there for a vaccine and a checkup. The staff is absolutely wonderful and did everything…

Katie Singer

The staff at Harbour Cities Vet hospital are always very welcoming and friendly. Their services are fairly priced and they…

Gabrielle Robichaud

I have been here twice now with my newly adopted Greyhound. Great place & very friendly staff. Highly recommend!

Lisa Campagna

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Vestibular disease in companion animals

The vestibular system is a series of nerves, nuclei, portions of the brain, and organs of the inner ear that control the body’s sense of orientation and balance, helping the animal to understand movement. This system allows the animal to compensate for both their own movement and outside forces such as gravity, providing the ability to detect and respond to a stimulus. The vestibular system also works in conjunction with input from the eyes and proprioception from muscles, skin, and joints allowing the body to integrate sensory input and maintain balance. (Watson, etc.) To maintain normal balance, the three canals within the inner ear are filled with fluid and sensory hairs, both of which respond to the orientation of the head. Each tube is positioned at a 90 degree angle to the next and is more sensitive to movements that lie on its specific plane. As the fluid moves within the tubules, the hairs are stimulated and send nerve impulses to the brain. These never impulses are read and a message is sent to the body to respond, maintaining balance.

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