Our team continues to be here for you and your cherished pets. We are OPEN and are now able to provide a wide range of services. To learn more about the changes we have implemented in response to COVID-19 and what to expect during your next visit, click here.

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Dog Spaying and Neutering

At Dartmouth Veterinary Hospital, we believe that spaying or neutering your dog is a large part of responsible pet ownership. Not only does it help control the population of homeless dogs, but it can also have significant health benefits, and in some cases can lessen or even put an end to undesirable behaviours such as; roaming, marking their territory, leg cocking, humping, and aggression.

What does neutering/spaying a dog do?

Spaying your female dog is an elective surgery where your veterinarian removes their reproductive organs (ovaries and uterus) making conception impossible. Neutering your male dog is also an elective surgery in which the veterinarian removes his reproductive organs (testes, sections of his testicular blood vessels, and spermatic ducts). Both of these surgeries are routine and are performed at the clinic regularly.

Why is it important to neuter or spay my dog?

By having your female dog spayed at this time you are reducing her risk of some medical conditions such as mammary tumours and pyometra, a life-threatening infection of the uterus. By neutering your male dog, you can help to prevent prostate issues, related tumours and other issues that may arise later in life.

How old should a dog be before neutering/spaying?

There is no absolute right age to spay or neuter your dog, but in general our veterinarians usually suggest spaying before your dog’s first estrus or “heat”, usually around six months of age. As for neutering your dog, the recommendation is usually a little bit later, somewhere around 8-12 months, which can be dependent on breed. Generally, it’s best to wait until they are fully grown, and their bones have fully developed before going ahead with the surgery, although in some cases neutering may be warranted as early as 6-7 months. The best way to determine the appropriate age for your pet to be spayed or neutered is to speak to your veterinarian. A good time for you to have this discussion with them might be at your final puppy visit around 16 weeks of age. Together, you and your veterinarian can make the right choice for your individual pet’s well-being.

How much does it cost to neuter/spay a dog?

Pricing varies depending on your dog’s needs. When pricing out spays, and neuters always ensure they include I.V fluids, the option of bloodwork, and microchip. Also, ask if you can tour the facility or meet with a tech prior to the day of the procedure. Contact Dartmouth Veterinary Hospital at 902-434-0700 and we can provide you with a personalized quote for you and your dog.

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COVID-19: Additional measures we are taking

Dear Clients,

Due to the close contact that our work requires, we have taken additional measures to protect you and our team while providing care for your furry family members.

The following policies were updated Monday, June 1, 2020:

1. We are currently operating a "closed waiting room" policy to protect our clients and staff. When you arrive, please remain in your vehicle and use your cell phone to call us at 902.434.0700. We will confirm your information and a receptionist will come out to bring your pet into the clinic for an examination with the veterinarian. If you have an iPhone, we have set up our clinic iPad for you to FaceTime with the vet during the exam or we have the capability of doing Skype for video-calling during the exam as well. If you do not have either of these as options, once the examination is finished, the veterinarian will call to discuss our recommended treatment plan over the phone while you remain outside. A staff member will then return to your vehicle with your pet and bring any items to go home with you. Please ensure your pet has a properly fitted collar or is in a secure carrier. Please remove any additional clothing or blankets prior to our staff handling our patients to minimize risk to our team. We will either ring you through at your vehicle with our portable debit/credit machine or we accept credit card payments over the phone. We are not taking cash at this time.

2. We are still OPEN but are working with limited staff and trying to limit human exposure, including staff-to-staff, as much as possible with deep disinfecting occurring after we close for the day.
Monday, Thursday: 7:15 am - 9:00 pm
Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday: 7:15 am - 8:00 pm
Saturday: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm
Sunday: CLOSED

3. If you are ordering food or medications, please allow 2-4 business days as our suppliers are dealing with increased demand and are trying to fill orders as quickly as possible. We will advise you as soon as your order arrives. Please call us when you arrive to pick up your order, but do not enter the hospital. Our staff will bring your order to your car and take payment over the phone or via our portable debit/credit machine at your vehicle. You can also use our online store and have your food delivered directly to your home or order and pay via the website and pick up at the clinic. To sign up for the online store, visit our website.

4. For the time being, we are not accepting cash as payment. Credit cards and debit card payments are still available.

5. Following the recommendations of our government and medical experts, we are doing our best to practice social distancing within the constraints of our roles. As such, we have taken measures to avoid both contracting and facilitating the spread of this virus. You may see our team members wearing additional protective gear when interacting with our clients and patients.

Thank you for helping us be diligent for everyone's safety. As we have heard from all levels of government, the situation is fluid and any updates will be provided as changes occur.

- Your dedicated team at Dartmouth Veterinary Hospital