Our team continues to be here for you and your cherished pets. We are OPEN and are now able to provide a wide range of services. To learn more about the changes we have implemented in response to COVID-19 and what to expect during your next visit, click here.

902.826.1933

The One-Eyed Bandit!

Meet Bandit! The one-eyed Bandit!

Bandit came in to see me to have her eye examined. The white part (sclera) of her eye had been discoloured for some time but was not bothering her. Recently the discoloured portion had become swollen and was gradually increasing in size. After performing several diagnostic tests, it was determined that Bandit had an eye tumour, and the best course of action was enucleation.

Enucleation is the surgical removal of an eye and is undertaken to prevent pain or spread of disease. The most common reason I see dogs for enucleation is medically non-responsive glaucoma (elevated ocular pressure) in dogs. In Bandit’s case, we were concerned about local and possibly systemic damage caused by cancer.

Enucleation in dogs is considered a treatment of last resort, when all previous attempts to salvage a comfortable visual eye have failed or if maintaining the eye serves greater risk than removing it. The procedure is carried out under full general anesthetic, and there is a high chance of a successful outcome. In Bandit’s case, the risk of ocular cancer-causing further localized tissue damage or spreading elsewhere throughout the body was deemed too high to maintain the presence of the eye.

From my perspective, clients initially have a hard time making this decision. The loss of an eye or partial vision to a person is seen as terrible. Not to take away from the seriousness of this in dogs, but I find my patients don’t care. They don’t have to drive; they don’t read the newspaper or watch TV. They don’t dwell on things beyond their control, nor do they internalize the sympathies from their friends/family. They depend upon so many other senses to gather information THEY NEED that the loss of an eye is…well… not so bad. That is their reality.

I enucleated Bandits eye, and the cancer is gone. For the One-Eyed Bandit – life is the same. She can still do the things that she loves to do, and thanks to enucleation, she can do these things painlessly for a long time.

If you have any questions about your pet’s health, give us a call at 902.826.1933 to make an appointment.

Written by: Dr. Rob Doucette, DVM

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The Importance of Microchipping Your Pet

Pets can get lost which can be a traumatic and possibly tragic event.  It’s important to have a collar and ID tag, but these are not foolproof.  Collars can break or fall off leaving your pet unidentifiable. This can be prevented with the use of a microchip. As noted in the Dartmouth Tribune in April 2017: A pet is lost every seven seconds One in three pets will go missing in their lifetime Only 2 percent of lost cats and 17 percent of lost dogs with ID return home When a pet gets lost, they are 20 times more likely to make their way back home when they have a microchip A microchip is a small chip that is encoded with a unique identification number.  It is no bigger than a grain of rice and implanted just under the surface of your pet’s skin.  The process is similar to receiving a vaccination through a needle and is virtually painless to pets.  Once implanted, the microchip remains between the shoulder blades just beneath the skin for the rest of the animal’s lifetime, becoming a permanent form of identification. Since it’s under your pets’ skin it can’t break or fall off like a collar or tag. The chip is powered by a scanner which sends a signal to the chip and receives the identification number stored on it.  A vet or shelter can use the scanner to read your pet’s chip.  With the identification number, your pet’s information is a phone call away. When your pet is microchipped, it is linked to a database with your contact info.  It is essential that you register the microchip and ensure your contact information is kept up to date.  If you move or change phone numbers be sure to update your information.  Microchips are reliable and use nationwide registries, but they depend on the information you provide. If you want to improve your chances of getting your pet back home quickly and safely microchipping is highly recommended.   Written by Tracy LeFler, Site Coordinator Edited by Janis Wall, RVT

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COVID-19: Additional measures we are taking

UPDATED June 1, 2020

Our clinic hours are changing! Until further notice our hours are:

Monday - Friday: 8:00 am - 8:00 pm
Saturday: 9:00 am - 4:00 pm

Due to the close contact that our work requires, we have taken additional measures to protect you and our team while providing care for your furry family members.

1. We are currently operating a "closed waiting room" policy to protect our clients and staff. When you arrive, please remain in your vehicle and use your cell phone to call us at 902.826.1933. We will take a history of your pet over the phone, and bring your pet into the clinic for an examination with the veterinarian. Once the examination is finished, we will call to discuss our recommended treatment plan over the phone and then return to your vehicle with your pet. Please ensure your pet has a properly fitted collar or is in a secure carrier. Please remove any additional clothing or blankets prior to our staff handling our patients to minimize risk to our team.

2. If you are ordering food or medications, please allow 2-4 business days as our suppliers are dealing with increased demand and are trying to fill orders as quickly as possible. We will advise you as soon as your order arrives. Please call us when you arrive to pick up your order, but do not enter the hospital. Our staff will bring your order to your car and take payment over the phone. You can also use our online store and have your food delivered directly to your home. To sign up for the online store, visit our website.

3. For the time being, we are not accepting cash as payment. Credit cards and debit card payments are still available.

Online consultations are now available! If you wish to connect with a veterinarian via message, phone or video, visit our website and follow the "Online Consultation" link.

Following the recommendations of our government and medical experts, we are doing our best to practice social distancing within the constraints of our roles. As such, we have taken measures to avoid both contracting and facilitating the spread of this virus. You may see our team members wearing additional protective gear when interacting with our clients and patients.

Thank you for helping us be diligent for everyone's safety. As we have heard from all levels of government, the situation is fluid and any updates will be provided as changes occur.

- Your dedicated team at Westwood Hills Veterinary Hospital